A sunny day in Brighton

Escape to Brighton

In order to get to Brighton from where we now live in Kent, it’s easier to take a 25-minute cab ride west to a small train station than go into Central London only to come back out again. And so that’s what we do today. It’s overcast and cool, 18 degrees after a record-breaking week of 30+ degrees. And we’re revelling in the cooler temperatures.

We always seems to go to Brighton when it rains. In the past five years, I only have one clear memory of a sun-drenched day on the front when the tops of my feet got sunburned in my ballet flats and my ever-present jumper stayed in my bag the entire day. It stands out as a perfect day because I won at crazy golf – something that very rarely happens – though I still lost every game of air hockey.

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What I Learned Working at Agencies

Today is my last day working at a digital agency.

Monday I move client-side, and I can’t wait! However, like the reflective introvert that I am, I wanted to note down what I’ve learned from working at agencies and what I’m taking with me.

A quick tally…eight years, five agencies, two countries and dozens of clients. Roles I’ve held: copywriter, account manager, producer. Industries I’ve worked across: politics, financial services, hospitality, beauty, fashion, travel. Specialisations I’ve developed: direct mail marketing, subscription-based marketing, website design and build, email marketing, social media marketing. Photo shoots I’ve assisted: three. Video shoots I’ve managed: one. Influencer activities I’ve organised: upwards of ten.

No wonder I’m knackered! Continue reading

An introduction to Vancouver

To be honest, I didn’t have time to form preconceptions of Vancouver. We booked the trip at the beginning of the year, then proceeded to move to our dream house in Kent, which had to be fully kitted out, and I pursued a new role client-side (good-bye agency life!). Whirlwind doesn’t begin to describe it. I’d seen a few images of British Columbia, but my knowledge of things to do in Vancouver barely filled a hastily opened Google doc.

And so, we – inveterate planners who ran out of time – committed ourselves to spontaneity and word-of-mouth recommendations for things to do and places to eat and boarded our British Airways direct flight to Vancouver. A mere 8.5 hours later, aligned with the setting sun, we touched down in a city shrouded by twilight and clouds.

And what we found surprised us.  Continue reading

Book Review: A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler

“In the Whitshank family, two stories had travelled down through the generations. These stories were viewed as quintessential – as defining, in some way – and every family member, including Stem’s three-year-old, had heard them told and retold and embroidered and conjectured upon any number of times.”

It is, in a way, this mythmaking that all of us take part in that A Spool of Blue Thread is all about. Anne Tyler’s twentieth novel is also – simply – about family. But that is a subject at once so ordinary in its familiarity and at the same time extraordinary in its unique complications and dramas, that it takes the deft hands of an author like Tyler to raise it above the commonplace or maudlin. Continue reading

Book Review: Stone Mattress by Margaret Atwood

When cold weather draws in and the lights are extinguished from mid-afternoon on, I long to hibernate. To be warm and cosy at home, baking or reading or catching up on recorded episodes of Strictly. But there are times I can be coaxed into a detour on my way out of the office, and the chance to discuss Margaret Atwood’s Stone Mattress (Bloomsbury) with the lovely crew over at the Society of Young Publishers was one such recent occasion.

The opening line

‘The freezing rain sifts down, handfuls of shining rice thrown by some unseen celebrant.’ Continue reading

NYC Skyline by Philipp Henzler

Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote

Like so many others, I came to know Breakfast at Tiffany’s through the Audrey Hepburn film, which I first watched as a teenager and have replayed incessantly over the past two decades. For me, Audrey is incomparable. Never mind Clara Bow; Audrey is the it girl I have always aspired to.

When I learned that London’s National Portrait Gallery was opening an exhibit dedicated to iconic portraits of Audrey paired with screenings of her films (including Breakfast at Tiffany’s), I decided it was high time to read Truman Capote’s book and discover the original story behind Holly Golightly. What I found surprised me. Continue reading